Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

Common Name(s)

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare type of cancer that usually develops in the system of the body where white blood cells are produced and circulated, known as the lymphatic system. White blood cells travel through the body to fight disease, destroy bacteria, and produce antibodies that fight viruses and bacteria. AITLs occur when a mutation in DNA causes the type of white blood cells called "T-cells" to grow out of control, which can form a lump or a tumor. The most common locations where AITL develops are the lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow. Some of these cancerous cells can break off and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body and grow there.

AITL most commonly occurs in the elderly population, though it can appear in all age groups. The most common symptom of AITL is the swelling or enlargement of the lymph nodes near the neck, mouth, or cheeks (lymphadenopathy), which may or may not be painful. Depending on the sizes of these growths, one may experience difficulty swallowing as well. Other common symptoms may include the enlargement of the liver or spleen (hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, respectively), fevers, night sweats, weight loss, and the development of autoimmune diseases (where the body mistakenly produces antibodies that attack healthy cells and tissues rather than bacteria and viruses). Diagnoses are made usually with a combination of a physical exam, imaging studies, and other laboratory studies.

Treatment for AITL depends on many factors such as how large the cancer is and if it has spread to other areas of the body. If you or a family member has been diagnosed with AITL, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also available for more resources and information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma" returned 93 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hypercalcemia as a rare presentation of angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma: a case report.
 

Author(s): Sana Chams, Inaya Hajj Hussein, Skye El Sayegh, Nour Chams, Khalid Zakaria

Journal:

 

Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma is a rare malignancy, accounting for only 2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas, first described in the 1970s and subsequently accepted as a distinct entity in the current World Health Organization classification. Due to the paucity of this disease, there ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction assay and peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid clamp method for RHOA mutation detection in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.
 

Author(s): Sharna Tanzima Nuhat, Mamiko Sakata-Yanagimoto, Daisuke Komori, Keiichiro Hattori, Yasuhito Suehara, Kota Fukumoto, Manabu Fujisawa, Manabu Kusakabe, Kosei Matsue, Hirotake Wakamatsu, Mitsunobu Shimadzu, Shigeru Chiba

Journal: Cancer Sci.. 2018 May;109(5):1682-1689.

 

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a subtype of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Somatic RHOA mutations, most frequently found at the hotspot site c.50G > T, p.Gly17Val (G17V RHOA mutation) are a genetic hallmark of AITL. Detection of the G17V RHOA mutations assists ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Invasive Aspergillosis in Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma.
 

Author(s): Prakash Np, Anoop Tm, Rakul Nambiar, Jaisankar Puthusseri, Swapna B

Journal: Turk J Haematol. 2018 Mar;35(1):91.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma" returned 13 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Therapeutic effect of chidamide on relapsed refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A case report and literature review.
 

Author(s): Jingxia Jin, Cuiping Zheng, Shenghao Wu

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jan;97(2):e9611.

 

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a kind of rare peripheral T cell lymphoma, which usually has acute onset at old age.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Mutational heterogeneity of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma indicates distinct lymphomagenic pathways.
 

Author(s): Mathijs Willemsen, Myrurgia Abdul Hamid, Bjorn Winkens, Axel Zur Hausen

Journal:

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Recent Progress in the Understanding of Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma.
 

Author(s): Manabu Fujisawa, Shigeru Chiba, Mamiko Sakata-Yanagimoto

Journal: J Clin Exp Hematop. 2017 ;57(3):109-119.

 

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) has been classified as a subtype of mature T-cell neoplasms. The recent revision of the WHO classification proposed a new category of nodal T-cell lymphoma with follicular helper T (TFH)-cell phenotype, which was classified into three diseases: ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Chidamide With PET Regimen for Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma (PET: Prednisone, Etoposide and Thalidomide)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

 

Last Updated: 20 Sep 2017

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Efficacy and Safety of Oral Azacitidine Compared to Investigator's Choice Therapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory AITL
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Relapsed Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

 

Last Updated: 18 Jul 2018

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Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Follicular T-Cell Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides AJCC v7; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides AJCC v7; Stage III Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides AJCC v7

 

Last Updated: 25 May 2018

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