Enterovirus

Common Name(s)

Enterovirus

Enteroviruses are a group of small viruses that usually infect the gastrointestinal tract or respiratory system initially, but can spread throughout the body. The virus can cause no symptoms until years later. Enteroviruses can be classified into two groups, polioviruses and non-polio enteroviruses. Although polioviruses are almost completely prevented through vaccination, non-polio enteroviruses can be the cause of a wide variety of diseases and symptoms. While many enteroviral infections cause mild cold or flu-like symptoms, fever or a rash (hand-foot-and-mouth disease) or no symptoms at all, other enteroviral infections may sometimes infect the heart (myocarditis), brain (encephalitis), central nervous system (meningitis) or or respiratory system (causing problems with breathing). Actual symptoms depend on which enterovirus is causing the infection. Enteroviral infections spread very much like the common cold, such as through a person’s saliva or any contact with contaminated surface or object. Infants and children are usually at the highest risk for enterovirus infections, but adults with weak immune systems may be infected as well. A doctor most often diagnoses an enterovirus infection through a physical examination and observed symptoms. Blood tests are available for certain types of enterovirus and may be used for confirmation. There are currently no effective anti-vrial medications for enteroviral infections. Treatment depends on the symptoms and may include supportive care such as bedrest, pain relievers and fever reducers. If the infection is severe, hospitalization may be needed. The best way to stop the spread of enteroviral infections is to wash your hands carefullly before eating or touching your mouth or eyes, especially if you are caring for someone who is sick. Individuals should also avoid kissing, hugging, sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick. If you or a family member have symptoms which seem to be get

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Following organizations serve the condition "Enterovirus" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Enterovirus" returned 887 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Enterovirus and Parechovirus Surveillance - United States, 2014-2016.
 

Author(s): Glen R Abedi, John T Watson, W Allan Nix, M Steven Oberste, Susan I Gerber

Journal:

 

Infections caused by enteroviruses (EV) and parechoviruses (PeV), members of the Picornaviridae family, are associated with various clinical manifestations, including hand, foot, and mouth disease; respiratory illness; myocarditis; meningitis; and sepsis; and can result in death. ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Viral chimeras decrypt the role of enterovirus capsid proteins in viral tropism, acid sensitivity and optimal growth temperature.
 

Author(s): Léna Royston, Manel Essaidi-Laziosi, Francisco J Pérez-Rodríguez, Isabelle Piuz, Johan Geiser, Karl-Heinz Krause, Song Huang, Samuel Constant, Laurent Kaiser, Dominique Garcin, Caroline Tapparel

Journal:

 

Despite their genetic similarities, enteric and respiratory enteroviruses (EVs) have highly heterogeneous biophysical properties and cause a vast diversity of human pathologies. In vitro differences include acid sensitivity, optimal growth temperature and tissue tropism, which reflect ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Congenital cytomegalovirus, parvovirus and enterovirus infection in Mozambican newborns at birth: A cross-sectional survey.
 

Author(s): Lola Madrid, Rosauro Varo, Sonia Maculuve, Tacilta Nhampossa, Carmen Muñoz-Almagro, Enrique J Calderón, Cristina Esteva, Carla Carrilho, Mamudo Ismail, Begoña Vieites, Vicente Friaza, María Del Carmen Lozano-Dominguez, Clara Menéndez, Quique Bassat

Journal:

 

Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is the most prevalent congenital infection acquired worldwide, with higher incidence in developing countries and among HIV-exposed children. Less is known regarding vertical transmission of parvovirus B19 (B19V) and enterovirus (EV). We ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Enterovirus" returned 53 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Direct-acting antivirals and host-targeting strategies to combat enterovirus infections.
 

Author(s): Lisa Bauer, Heyrhyoung Lyoo, Hilde M van der Schaar, Jeroen Rpm Strating, Frank Jm van Kuppeveld

Journal: Curr Opin Virol. 2017 06;24():1-8.

 

Enteroviruses (e.g., poliovirus, enterovirus-A71, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-D68, rhinovirus) include many human pathogens causative of various mild and more severe diseases, especially in young children. Unfortunately, antiviral drugs to treat enterovirus infections have not been ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Impact of genetic changes, pathogenicity and antigenicity on Enterovirus- A71 vaccine development.
 

Author(s): Pinn Tsin Isabel Yee, Chit Laa Poh

Journal: Virology. 2017 06;506():121-129.

 

Enterovirus-A71 (EV-A71) is an etiological agent of the hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). EV-A71 infection produces high fever and ulcers in children. Some EV-A71 strains produce severe infections leading to pulmonary edema and death. Although the protective efficacy of the inactivated ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Impact of Enterovirus Testing on Resource Use in Febrile Young Infants: A Systematic Review.
 

Author(s): Sowdhamini S Wallace, Michelle A Lopez, A Chantal Caviness

Journal: Hosp Pediatr. 2017 02;7(2):96-102.

 

Enterovirus infection commonly causes fever in infants aged 0 to 90 days and, without testing, is difficult to differentiate from serious bacterial infection.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Clinical Study on Combined Immune Effect of EV71 Inactivated Vaccine
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Enterovirus 71 Inactivated Vaccine; HFMD

 

Last Updated: 25 Apr 2018

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Last Updated: 6 Sep 2016

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European Paediatric AFM Associated With EV-D68 Follow-up Study.
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Flaccid Hemiplegia; Flaccid Paraplegia; Flaccid Tetraplegia, Unspecified; Enterovirus D68; Myelitis, Infectious

 

Last Updated: 7 May 2018

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