Epidermal nevus

Common Name(s)

Epidermal nevus

Epidermal nevi are congenital lesions that affect about 1 in 1,000 people. They appear at or shortly after birth as localized epidermal thickening with hyperpigmentation that frequently follow the lines of Blaschko, suggesting that they result from postzygotic somatic mutation in the skin ({10:Paller et al., 1994}). A rare subgroup of epidermal nevi is clinically indistinguishable from other epidermal nevi, but displays histopathologic features typical of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (see EHK, {113800}), and patients with this type of epidermal nevi sometimes have offspring with generalized EHK ({10:Paller et al., 1994}). Woolly hair nevus is a rare condition characterized by the development of woolly hair in a restricted area on the scalp, either present at birth or becoming evident later in life when scalp hair begins to grow. Woolly hair nevus can be an isolated finding or can occur in association with additional ectodermal defects; epidermal nevi have been reported in association with woolly hair nevi (summary by {11:Ramot and Zlotogorski, 2015}). Nevus sebaceous, a benign congenital skin lesion that preferentially affects the scalp and face, is characterized by hairless, yellow-orange plaques of various size and shape. Histology shows that nevus sebaceous is a hamartoma consisting of epidermal, sebaceous, and apocrine elements. About 24% of nevi develop secondary tumors, some of which may be malignant (summary by {2:Groesser et al., 2012}). Also see giant pigmented hairy nevus ({137550}) and malignant melanoma ({155600}).
 

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Epidermal nevus" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Epidermal nevus" returned 41 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Is Ki-67, keratin 16, involucrin, and filaggrin immunostaining sufficient to diagnose inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus? A report of eight cases and a comparison with psoriasis vulgaris.
 

Author(s): Jing Peng, Shu-Bin Sun, Pei-Pei Yang, Yi-Ming Fan

Journal: An Bras Dermatol. ;92(5):682-685.

 

Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus and linear psoriasis are sometimes hard to differentiate clinically and pathologically. Although immunohistochemical expression of keratin 10 (K10), K16, Ki-67, and involucrin may be useful for differentiating both entities, these results ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A Case of Cap Polyposis with Epidermal Nevus in an Infant.
 

Author(s): Soon Chul Kim, Myoung Jae Kang, Yeon Jun Jeong, Pyoung Han Hwang

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2017 May;32(5):880-884.

 

Cap polyposis is extremely rare in children. We report a case of an 11-month-old male infant who visited our hospital because of rectal prolapse and small amount of hematochezia lasting several days. He also had an epidermal nevus in the sacral area. Colonoscopy showed erythematous, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a multiple verrucous epidermal nevus.
 

Author(s): Samira Yarak, Taila Yuri Siqueira Machado, Marilia Marufuji Ogawa, Mirian Luzia da Silva Almeida, Milvia Maria Simões E Silva Enokihara, Adriana Maria Porro

Journal: An Bras Dermatol. ;91(5 suppl 1):166-168.

 

Verrucous epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesions of the epidermis that, unlike other epidermal nevi (such as sebaceous nevus or nevus comedonicus), are rarely associated with malignant neoplasms. The majority of squamous cell carcinoma develop in linear or multiple epidermal nevus ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Epidermal nevus" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Oral linear epidermal nevus: a review of the literature and report of two new cases.
 

Author(s): Domenico Tesi, Giuseppe Ficarra

Journal: Head Neck Pathol. 2010 Jun;4(2):139-43.

 

Linear epidermal nevus (LEN) is a sporadic hamartomatous lesion of the skin due to the proliferation of clones of embryonic ectodermal cells, which are arranged according to a typical linear configuration known as Blaschko's lines. Oral involvement of LEN is very rare and few cases ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Open Label Trial Assessing Safety and Efficacy of Burosumab (KRN23), in a Patient With ENS and Hypophosphatemic Rickets
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypophosphatemia; Hypophosphatemic Rickets; Pain, Chronic

 

Last Updated: 26 Jun 2018

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Identification of Biomarkers for Patients With Vascular Anomalies
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Vascular Anomaly; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Gorham-Stout Disease; Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome; Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular Malformations, and Epidermal Nevi

 

Last Updated: 12 Feb 2018

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