Febrile seizures

Common Name(s)

Febrile seizures

Febrile seizures are seizures that affect children and are usually triggered by high fever, often due to an infection. During a febrile seizure a child may rapidly shake, twitch, moan, roll their eyes, or lose consciousness. Febrile seizures most often occur in children between 6 months and 5 years of age. However, the highest risk period for a febrile seizure is between 12 months and 18 months of age. Children with a family history of febrile seizures are at an increased risk for these seizures. Fortunately, febrile seizures are typically harmless and do not cause any other health problems. They are usually seen as the brain’s response to a high fever. There are two forms of febrile seizures: simple and complex. Simple febrile seizures are more common and usually last between a few seconds to 15 minutes. Complex febrile seizures may last more than 15 minutes, happen more than once in the span of 24 hours, and occur on one side of the child’s body.

Doctors can diagnose febrile seizures by using a test called an electroencephalogram (EEG). This test checks the brain for unusual electrical activity often seen with a seizure. To find the cause of the febrile seizure, doctors may run blood tests, urine tests, or perform a spinal tap. A spinal tap is a procedure used to remove cerebrospinal fluid, fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord to protect them from injury, by inserting a small needle in the lower back. Treatment typically depends on the root cause and severity of the seizure and can range from treating the infection (antibiotics) to treating the seizures (antiepileptic medication). Talk with your child’s doctor or specialist to decide which treatment options are best for your child. Support groups are also good resources for support and information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Febrile seizures" for support, advocacy or research.

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Pediatric Brain Foundation

Pediatric Brain Foundation's Mission is Three-fold: 1. Expedite scientific research to find treatments and cures for ALL of the more than 14 million children, in the U.S. alone, living with some form of neurological disorder 2. Provide families and health care professionals with up-to-date information and resources on the latest discoveries in pediatric neurology 3. Educate the public and public officials on the critical importance of funding pediatric neurological research

Last Updated: 22 Apr 2015

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General Support Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Febrile seizures" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Pediatric Brain Foundation

Pediatric Brain Foundation's Mission is Three-fold: 1. Expedite scientific research to find treatments and cures for ALL of the more than 14 million children, in the U.S. alone, living with some form of neurological disorder 2. Provide families and health care professionals with up-to-date information and resources on the latest discoveries in pediatric neurology 3. Educate the public and public officials on the critical importance of funding pediatric neurological research

http://www.pediatricbrainfoundation.org

Last Updated: 22 Apr 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Febrile seizures" returned 172 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Long-term white matter tract reorganization following prolonged febrile seizures.
 

Author(s): Suresh S Pujar, Kiran K Seunarine, Marina M Martinos, Brian G R Neville, Rod C Scott, Richard F M Chin, Chris A Clark

Journal: Epilepsia. 2017 05;58(5):772-780.

 

Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated acute white matter changes following prolonged febrile seizures (PFS), but their longer-term evolution is unknown. We investigated a population-based cohort to determine white matter diffusion properties 8 years after PFS.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Interleukin-1β and interleukin-1receptor antagonist polymorphisms in Egyptian children with febrile seizures: A case-control study.
 

Author(s): Salah Al Morshedy, Hosam F Elsaadany, Hany E Ibrahim, Ashraf M Sherif, Mohsen A A Farghaly, Mayy A N Allah, Heba Abouzeid, Shaimaa S A Elashkar, Mohammed E Hamed, Manar M Fathy, Atef M Khalil, Maha A Noah, Mohamed S Hegab, Ahmed R Ahmed, Mustafa I A Hashem, Ahmed A Emam, Heba G Anany, Boshra R Ibrahim, Heba H Gawish, Rehab M Nabil, Lobna Abdel Fattah, Salah F Alsayed

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Mar;96(11):e6370.

 

Febrile seizure is the most common seizure disorder of childhood. Of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 is defined as the first endogenous pyrogen.We designed this study to investigate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) situated at positions -31 (C/T), and -511 (C/T) ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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The role of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio and red blood cell distribution width in the classification of febrile seizures.
 

Author(s): Y Yigit, S Yilmaz, A Akdogan, H C Halhalli, A E Ozbek, E G Gencer

Journal: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2017 Feb;21(3):554-559.

 

Most febrile seizures occur outside of hospitals, and in most cases, information about the characteristics of the seizures is obtained from the parents. This makes it difficult to differentiate between simple and complex seizures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Febrile seizures" returned 29 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Generation of Febrile Seizures and Subsequent Epileptogenesis.
 

Author(s): Bo Feng, Zhong Chen

Journal: Neurosci Bull. 2016 Oct;32(5):481-92.

 

Febrile seizures (FSs) occur commonly in children aged from 6 months to 5 years. Complex (repetitive or prolonged) FSs, but not simple FSs, can lead to permanent brain modification. Human infants and immature rodents that have experienced complex FSs have a high risk of subsequent ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).
 

Author(s): Peter Camfield, Carol Camfield

Journal: Epileptic Disord. 2015 Jun;17(2):124-33.

 

To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Origins of temporal lobe epilepsy: febrile seizures and febrile status epilepticus.
 

Author(s): Katelin P Patterson, Tallie Z Baram, Shlomo Shinnar

Journal: Neurotherapeutics. 2014 Apr;11(2):242-50.

 

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) commonly arise following early-life long seizures, and especially febrile status epilepticus (FSE). However, there are major gaps in our knowledge regarding the causal relationships of FSE, TLE, HS and cognitive disturbances ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Fever After Simultaneous Versus Sequential Vaccination in Young Children
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Fever After Vaccination; Fever; Febrile Seizure

 

Last Updated: 23 Oct 2017

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