Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

Common Name(s)

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a genetic skin disease. Common symptoms include sparse scalp and body hair, reduced ability to sweat, and missing teeth. HED is caused by mutations in the EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD genes. It may be inherited in an X-linked recessive, autosomal recessive, or autosomal dominant manner depending on the genetic cause of the condition. The X-linked form is the most common form. The forms have similar signs and symptoms, however the the autosomal dominant form tends to be the mildest. Treatment of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia may include special hair care formulas or wigs, measures to prevent overheating, removal of ear and nose concretions, and dental evaluations and treatment (e.g., restorations, dental implants, or dentures).
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia" returned 72 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Next-generation Sequencing Identified a Novel EDA Mutation in a Chinese Pedigree of Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia with Hyperplasia of the Sebaceous Glands.
 

Author(s): Xue-Gang Xu, Yuan Lv, Hongwei Yan, Le Qu, Ting Xiao, Long Geng, Chun-Di He, Cai-Xia Liu, Xing-Hua Gao, Yuan-Hong Li, Hong-Duo Chen

Journal: Acta Derm. Venereol.. 2017 Aug;97(8):984-985.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
[Clinical and molecular study in a family with autosomal dominant hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].
 

Author(s): Michele Callea, Francisco Cammarata-Scalisi, Colin E Willoughby, Sabrina R Giglio, Ilaria Sani, Sara Bargiacchi, Giovanna Traficante, Emanuele Bellacchio, Gianluca Tadini, Izzet Yavuz, Angela Galeotti, Gabriella Clarich

Journal: Arch Argent Pediatr. 2017 02;115(1):e34-e38.

 

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a rare disease characterized by deficiency in development of structure derived from the ectoderm and is caused by mutations in the genes EDA, EDAR, or EDARADD. Phenotypes caused by mutations in these three may exhibit similar clinical features, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
A Splice Defect in the EDA Gene in Dogs with an X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XLHED) Phenotype.
 

Author(s): Dominik P Waluk, Gila Zur, Ronnie Kaufmann, Monika M Welle, Vidhya Jagannathan, Cord Drögemüller, Eliane J Müller, Tosso Leeb, Arnaud Galichet

Journal:

 

X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) caused by variants in the EDA gene represents the most common ectodermal dysplasia in humans. We investigated three male mixed-breed dogs with an ectodermal dysplasia phenotype characterized by marked hypotrichosis and multifocal ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

EDA mutation as a cause of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): S X Huang, J L Liang, W G Sui, H Lin, W Xue, J J Chen, Y Zhang, W W Gong, Y Dai, M L Ou

Journal:

 

Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) represents a collection of rare disorders that result from a failure of development of the tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm. ED is often associated with hair, teeth, and skin abnormalities, which are serious conditions affecting the quality of ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Molecular basis of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: an update.
 

Author(s): Wieslaw H Trzeciak, Ryszard Koczorowski

Journal: J. Appl. Genet.. 2016 Feb;57(1):51-61.

 

Recent advances in understanding the molecular events underlying hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) caused by mutations of the genes encoding proteins of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-related signaling pathway have been presented. These proteins are involved in signal ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Hypohidrotic and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a report of two cases.
 

Author(s): Marianne Vasconcelos Carvalho, José Romero Souto de Sousa, Filipe Paiva Correa de Melo, Tatiane Fonseca Faro, Ana Clara Nunes Santos, Silvia Carvalho, Ana Paula Veras Sobral

Journal:

 

Ectodermal dysplasias are a large group of syndromes characterized by anomalies in the structures of ectodermal origin. There are 2 major types of this disorder, based on clinical findings: hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. This clinical classification ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.